Burns and How to Treat Them

Whether it’s from hot cooking utensils, smoldering irons, blistering fires, or even the scorching sun, I now that everyone has been burned at least once in their lives.    A sun burn for example is the most common burn.  Burns can be incredibly painful and inconvenient.  We’ve all heard of victims suffering first, second or third degree burns, although most people are not as familiar with these terms.  Considering the recent onslaught of fires in our country, it made some of us here at The Ready Project wonder about fire and burns.  Honestly I didn't know that much about them and how to treat them until I did some research.  Here's the basic information that you need to know in an emergency situation.

First Degree Burn – A first degree burn is the least severe.  It only burns the first layer of skin leaving it red and probably a little sore.  A sun burn is a prime example of a first degree burn.  These burns you can treat yourself and do not have to seek medical attention.

Treatment:  Run burn under cool (not cold) water for 10-15 minutes until pain has subsided.  Cover the burn with a band-aid or gauze.   Apply doses of burn creams in increments until the burn has properly healed.

Second Degree Burn – This burn penetrates through to the second layer of skin.  It is slightly more severe than a first degree burn.  With this burn you can expect blisters, red splotchy skin, and often intense throbbing pain.  If you do not see blisters then you can treat the burn yourself with some Aloe Vera or burn ointment.

Treatment:  Run burn under cool (not cold) water for 10-15 minutes until pain has subsided.  Cover the burn with a band-aid or gauze.  Apply doses of burn creams in increments until the burn has properly healed.  If there are blisters then you can seek medical attention to help remedy the burns.  Do not burst blisters as this may cause greater risk of infection.

Third Degree Burn – A third degree burn is the most intense and severe burn.  You should seek medical attention immediately to help treat the burn.  A third degree burn has burned through all three layers of skin and sometimes even continues on into the muscle and even the bone.  You will see charred and blackened skin but the victim will probably feel no pain because the burn has done damage to the nerves leaving no feeling.

Treatment:  Do not remove burned clothing unless it is causing more burn damage to the victim.  Do not immerse large areas in cold or cool water as this may cause a large drop in temperature and victim may experience hypothermia.  Do not cover burns in gauze which can put lint into the open wounds.  Elevate the burned area above the heart.  Cover the victim’s burns in a cool, sterile, damp cloth to help cool the burn.  Usually in cases were the skin has been burned off the victim will need a skin graph to help them heal.

As you can see in the picture above, his skin has been burnt all the way to his joints and bone.

Of course the best is to avoid any situation where you can potentially get burnt but that is not always possible.  Accidents happen and are sometimes inevitable.  Follow these guidelines if you every find yourself in an emergency situation.  Stock up in your food storage and emergency reserves with some First Aid Kits to help any injured persons.




kristenblunck
kristenblunck

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